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Plans Revealed for Professional Baseball in Murfreesboro

Their initial plan is to build a 4,500-seat stadium near the historic landmark Cannonsburgh Village, which would first have to be approved by the city council.

A professional baseball league has officially made its first pitch to the Murfreesboro City Council on why it hopes to bring an expansion team to the growing Rutherford County city.

The team would be a member of the American Association of Professional Baseball (AAPB), an independent and partner league with Major League Baseball (MLB).

News Flash • Murfreesboro, TN • CivicEngage

The league’s commissioner, Josh Schaub, and project developer, Jason Rose, told the overflow crowd at a recent city council workshop that Murfreesboro would be an ideal location for an AAPB team. Their initial plan is to build a 4,500-seat stadium downtown, near the historic landmark, Cannonsburgh Village. The plan would have to be approved by the city council.

“Helping to revitalize downtown Murfreesboro with a professional baseball franchise and a stadium in the heart of the City would not only attract residents and visitors to the facility, it would enhance downtown’s identity and assist with redevelopment,” says Mayor Shane McFarland.

According to developers and City planners, it will take two to three years to develop and construct a new ballpark in Murfreesboro no matter where a minor league stadium is located and built. Organizers hope to attract 2,500 to 3,500 fans a night to watch 55 home games a season.

Recent social media clamor about the possible stadium raised concerns from preservationists even before the proposal was presented to the City Council. City Council continues to be sensitive to the historic nature of downtown and its charm. Baseball and its long history provide an excellent platform to potential integrate Murfreesboro’s history into its ballpark design.

If authorized by City Council, final agreements would be hammered out between the City and the franchise organizers before being presented to the City Council for final approval in future meetings. If the plan is approved, AAPB hopes for an Opening Day in the spring of 2026.

You can read more about the American Association here.

 

 

About the Author

Michael Aldrich

Michael Aldrich is Nashville Parent's Managing Editor and a Middle Tennessee arts writer. He and his wife, Alison, are the proud parents of 4-year-old Ezra and baby Norah.